OSHA and Yard Tractor Operators

It’s a little-known fact OSHA considers yard tractors (also called mules, or hostlers, among other names) to be “powered industrial trucks” covered under 1910.178.  These are the tractors used for moving and spotting trailers around loading docks.

In a June 27, 2011 letter to safety trainer Bob Pfister, OSHA stated “Yard tractors that are not designed to U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specifications for over-the-road use would be considered a powered industrial truck per 29 CFR 1910.178(a)(1), and the definition of a powered industrial truck outlined in American National Standards Institute (ANSI) B56.1 – 1969. ANSI B56.1-1969 was one of the source national consensus standards for OSHA’s Powered Industrial Trucks standard. Vehicles that are approved for over-the-road use by the DOT would not be considered powered industrial vehicles and would be exempt from 29 CFR 1910.178.”

Yard tractor drivers are required to be provided training that meets the 1910.178 requirements.  The only exception is for trucks that are primarily intended to be used on the public roads.  However, almost every truck yard has a mule or two that are designed and intended for use only in truck yards, and are covered by these rules.  If your yard tractor has no license plates, there’s a clue for you right there.

Under OSHA’s Powered Industrial Truck training rules, the following is required:

  • Training must consist of a combination of formal instruction and practical training, which includes training on features and operation of the truck as well as conditions in the areas in which it will be used,
  • plus a record of the training, and
  • an initial evaluation to be repeated every three years.

If an operator has previously received training in a topic specified in the rule, appropriate to the truck and working conditions, additional training in that topic is not required if the operator has been evaluated and found competent to operate the truck safely.  Don’t assume that a driver who has a valid CDL won’t need to have the OSHA training.  Having a CDL isn’t necessarily enough.  Did the CDL training include a review of the particular hazards of operating a truck in your lot?  Was there a hands-on portion to cover the specific controls and features of the yard truck?

Although certainly not high on the OSHA radar, it is a rule that can come into question if there is an accident or complaint concerning these trucks.  There has been at least one OSHA Review Commission decision in which the defendant was required to prove that they had adequately trained their yard tractor drivers.  If you have yard trucks that stay in the yard, the training the drivers get merits checking into.


85 Comments »

  1. If a yard truck has license plates and can be used on the road then the driver must have a CDL correct? My question is this – if said yard truck is plated and the driver is operating it and the driver has a CDL does the driver have to follow all the rules and regulations that over the road drivers have to adhere to? Mainly the HOS rules.

    Comment by Jeff — December 9, 2013 @ 5:07 am

  2. William H. Kincaid

    Good question – according to DOT “CMVs used wholly on private property not open to public travel (such as yard hostlers and yard tractors in a motor carrier’s terminal) are
    exempt from all the FMCSRs.” OSHA exempts yard tractors with license plates for road use, so we have an interesting situation where very little regulation applies. It would be up to the employer to determine safe hours of service.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — July 24, 2014 @ 5:31 am

  3. needing some guidance on yard tractor training

    Comment by Judy Chapman — January 5, 2015 @ 3:30 pm

  4. William H. Kincaid

    You can use the OSHA rule as a guideline, but the content will have to be different. Some truck manufacturers offer their own yard truck safety videos and training – such as Kalmar’s: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Pm15lL91DY. Capacity also has their full training video posted on youtube.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — January 5, 2015 @ 4:33 pm

  5. Me podrían decir si aquí cerca de los Ángeles californiana hay una escuela de aprendizaje para las yard goat ( mulas por favor.

    Comment by Javier Rodríguez — January 6, 2015 @ 8:44 pm

  6. William H. Kincaid

    Mi consejo sería que pedir al distribuidor local de camiones si ofrecen entrenamiento. Gracias.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — January 8, 2015 @ 5:47 pm

  7. If an employee is going to drive this yard dog, do they need to do a pre-use inspection with documentation? Our drivers already have a PIT license but just learning about needing something for the yard dogs.

    Comment by Cathy Michelbrink — May 14, 2015 @ 6:46 am

  8. Good afternoon,

    Can anyone tell me who is responsible for securing the trailer’s nose jack stand of a uncoupled tractor before and after loading the trailer? The lift truck operator and/or the yard tractor operator.

    Thanks,
    Wm.

    Comment by William Taylor — June 11, 2015 @ 12:02 pm

  9. were in Chicago I can get a spotter certification I couldn’t find a place?

    Comment by gary chapple — June 26, 2015 @ 10:30 am

  10. William H. Kincaid

    Gary, I would start with the company that provides your yard trucks. These distributors are generally well-versed in where to find training, or have their own trainers on staff.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — June 26, 2015 @ 10:33 am

  11. William H. Kincaid

    The responsibility to set the jack stand can be assigned to either per the company’s dock rules, but the ultimate responsibility for making sure it’s done belongs to the forklift operator who loads and unloads the truck, per OSHA. NOte OSHA doesn’t say who does it, just who makes sure it gets done.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — June 26, 2015 @ 10:36 am

  12. William H. Kincaid

    The way I understand it the pre-shift inspection applies to any type of industrial truck, so yard dogs would be included. Obviously the inspection would be different from the one you might give a forklift, but the essential safety ares would need to be addressed at the start of the shift.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — June 26, 2015 @ 10:37 am

  13. Is a golf cart used in an industrial setup such as maintenance and construction considered a powered Industrial truck?

    Comment by Elio Romero — July 8, 2015 @ 6:14 am

  14. William H. Kincaid

    One might think golf carts are included in the standard because they are designed to carry people and light loads, are not licensable for over-the-road, are not construction vehicles and are not used in agriculture. However, in a letter of interpretation to Mr. Bob Pfister, OSHA said “ANSI/National Golf Car Manufacturers Association (NGCMA) Z130.1-2004 defines a golf car as, “a vehicle used to convey a person or persons and equipment to play the game of golf in an area designated as a golf course.” Golf cars are considered by design to be recreational vehicles and are exempt from 29 CFR 1910.178. Again, it is the design of the vehicle that is the determining factor of whether or not it is considered a powered industrial truck, rather than the manner in which it is utilized.” Not completely trusting that 100% of all OSHA inspectors would be aware of this interpretation, I did a search of OSHA citations for any involving golf carts and found a couple. A good interpretation to keep handy in the event your company gets cited under 1910.178 for no golf cart training!

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — July 8, 2015 @ 11:03 am

  15. Is a CDL required to Operate a mule

    Comment by luis — July 8, 2015 @ 11:30 am

  16. i work for the usps as a yard spotter am i required to wear a seatbelt in the yard for every move i do not go out on the road thanks gregg

    Comment by gregg johnson — July 31, 2015 @ 5:35 pm

  17. William H. Kincaid

    Greg, I know this is not necessarily good news, but yes, you should be wearing your seatbelt, as required by OSHA policy. It may seem like more trouble than it’s worth when driving at low speed in a lot but if you don’t have your seatbelt on you basically don’t have the protection of the vehicle. The injuries you would be exposed to if your truck was hit by one of the rigs in the lot would be worse than what they would be if you were wearing your seatbelt. I know 10 or 15 miles an hour doesn’t seem fast enough to require a seatbelt. Imagine running as fast as you can and heading straight into an oak tree. That’s a 15 mile an hour collision into a fixed object without a seatbelt. If you want to consider colliding with another vehicle traveling that same speed, just double it. I’m sure this sounds preachy, so I should add I was in a low speed head-on collision back in my younger days before I started wearing a seatbelt all the time like I do now. The feeling of regaining consciousness after knocking out my car’s windshield with my face is still pretty easy to remember – a Mike Tyson TKO punch on steroids.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — August 1, 2015 @ 8:59 am

  18. Do I need a CDL for a day cab with single axle? Its main purpose is a yard shifter but once a week it has to be taken for fuel the round trip is less than ten miles on road ?

    Comment by Jeffrey Shay — August 7, 2015 @ 12:46 pm

  19. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. 100% use in a parking lot is not CDL-required.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — August 7, 2015 @ 2:04 pm

  20. If a spotter truck is licensed, road-worthy and used on public roads even sparingly, it would not be subject to OSHA seat belt regulations as a powered industrial truck.
    However, if it is not licensed and never used on public roads then it is subject to OSHA regulations under 1910.178.
    Is this a correct understanding?

    Comment by michael metzger — August 20, 2015 @ 10:12 am

  21. William H. Kincaid

    To my understanding, OSHA does not consider licensed, roadworthy the vehicles to be “powered industrial trucks”. Therefore your conclusion seems to be correct. Also, OSHA has stated in one of the interpretations quoted elsewhere in the comment section the following:

    “…it is the design of the vehicle that is the determining factor of whether or not it is considered a powered industrial truck, rather than the manner in which it is utilized.”

    Following that logic, a vehicle designed for use on public roads would not be designed to be an industrial truck. I’m a little unsure as to that applying to yard tractors without license plates, however. The only reason most yard tractors ever enter a public roadway is to be taken for fueling or to the repair shop. They are designed to be used shuttling trailers for short distances in yards, and that’s about it. I think having the vehicle registered and putting a license plate on it even if it is designed for occasional road use is important in excepting it from the powered industrial truck rule.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — August 20, 2015 @ 10:31 am

  22. If a business has warehouses on both sides of the street and a dead end street or circle do I need a CDL to drive across and between warehouses

    Comment by Denny Luna — November 10, 2015 @ 9:51 pm

  23. William H. Kincaid

    Since 1992, anyone who drives a commercial vehicle on public streets is required to have a CDL. I think that applies in the situation you described as well. Look at it this way – what if a passenger car was on the street and you backed into it with the truck? You and the driver of the car would have to exchange drivers license information, right? And if the police were there, the first thing they would ask you for would be your drivers license. And your drivers license would have to be the right kind of license for the vehicle you’re driving. An ordinary passenger car drivers license wouldn’t seem to be the right thing for a tractor pulling a 52 foot long trailer. One might make the argument that it is not used in interstate commerce, but that is a tricky one as the Federal and state DOT’s have a way to stretch that definition to fit almost any situation where cargo may be involved such as in moving a loaded trailer. Their argument is if it is being moved as part of a process of it going from one state to another, even if it is being picked up and dropped in the same state, that is still interstate commerce. I’ve given up on trying to find situations that are clearly not interstate commerce when there is an interstate load involved. So, yes, I think the CDL is required.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — November 11, 2015 @ 3:27 am

  24. Hi William,

    Is it a requirement that the mule driver needs to have a CDL license? My business in in a private parking lot, no roads. Do I need a CDL driver to move trailers?

    Thank you in advanced

    Comment by Nelson — December 14, 2015 @ 4:00 pm

  25. my husband works in a yard driving a yard horse the truck is rated at 54,000 lbs is that the weight it can pull cause he says they pull 60,000 to 108,000 lbs is that a hazard and diesel fumes come in cab he comes home tried and coughing thank you

    Comment by Jennie Black — January 21, 2016 @ 10:28 am

  26. Golf carts are seen in construction, industrial, maritime and aviation facilities all over America. When they aren’t being used for the manufactures intended purpose (on a golf course) and they are used to transport passengers or cargo in these more “industrial or commercial” applications do they now fall under the ANSI B56.8 Standard. Personnel & Burden Carriers? They obviously don’t fall under the OSHA 29, 1910.178 Powered Industrial Trucks Standard as the words “Industrial Trucks” actually means what we now commonly call “Forklifts”.

    Comment by Mike Hemenway — March 11, 2016 @ 10:52 am

  27. I’m a husttler and wanted to know if i could get a part time job.. If i were to get a part time job would that effect my hours of serice? If i work in the yard do i have to follow the hour of service like if i was over the road?

    Comment by Irbai Ngiramos — April 22, 2016 @ 6:27 pm

  28. When driving a yard truck on the road, is it legal to have the hoist raised up to keep the landing gear off the ground or do you have to roll up the landing gear

    Comment by Brandon — May 30, 2016 @ 3:32 pm

  29. Is it legal to drive a tractor trailer on private property that is open to the public without a license

    Comment by David Bester — June 17, 2016 @ 7:40 pm

  30. My question is how many hours are allowed to work by the d.o.t. regulations per day for spotters???

    Comment by Primo — June 28, 2016 @ 7:07 am

  31. If we are using a yard dog to spot and move our trailers in our complex then all of sudden we have to go get Gas which is on the main Highway so we will need a CDL to move and we have 3 buildings in our complex’s and we will have to go back and forth and the 2nd building is about 500 yards away from us so I take it we will need a CDL.
    Thank you for your time

    Comment by Mike Fowler — July 19, 2016 @ 11:44 am

  32. Can the yard goat be left idylling for an extended amount of time?

    Comment by Ralph jones — August 2, 2016 @ 2:44 pm

  33. I am looking for a trainer for non-CDL yard mule drivers. I work at a high volume production plant in Conroe, Texas and the company is wanting our drivers trained professionally. Do you know of anyone who comes to the plant and would give a certification class for the drivers?

    Comment by Dreama — August 8, 2016 @ 4:54 pm

  34. I have a question I’m 18 years old can I drive a spotter / hostlers truck on a rail road yard without any license just a drivers permit?

    Comment by Joshua Taylor — August 23, 2016 @ 1:38 am

  35. If a yard horse is operated only on company property, in the state Michigan, are drivers required to have a CDL?

    Comment by Tom Brown — August 29, 2016 @ 11:27 am

  36. I am sure this question has been asked before. If a yard truck / spotter truck with hydraulic 5th wheel/ single seat tractor is not licensed is it able to go onto a public road to go get Fuel or to a maintenance shop? All our drivers are CDL certified that drive our Ottowa spotting trucks.

    Comment by john jansen — September 9, 2016 @ 7:48 am

  37. In the event you have a yard truck that can be licensed to travel public roads but the company has no intentions of taking it off the company property. Would the operator still be required to have a CDL?

    Comment by Bob Reed — September 14, 2016 @ 9:02 am

  38. Are were required to register our yard truck if we drive them for two blocks on a public street?

    Comment by Keith — November 11, 2016 @ 11:31 am

  39. What about hours of service

    Comment by Travis — November 26, 2016 @ 12:05 am

  40. Question

    Is there a set amount of miles on public roads a yard horse may travel if say stored at a warehouse but then goes to a plant to work each day and if so what about winter condiction.

    Thanks you
    RD

    Comment by Roger D Combs — December 8, 2016 @ 3:18 pm

  41. If you are required to use a yard dog on private property moving trailers in and out are you required to have CDLs to do this performance

    Comment by Robert Young — January 13, 2017 @ 7:03 am

  42. I have a CDL and I am trying to find out if I need a DOT physical card to operate a licensed jockey truck on a public road between yards for a distance of less than a mile?

    Comment by Timothy Wiley — January 21, 2017 @ 9:50 am

  43. My boss wants me to be trained in yard tractor ( they called it yard dog). Is it legal to be trained by a coworker who is not a certified yard tractor or yard dog operator? Does it need to be a certified yard tractoroperator to do this training?

    Comment by rey ramos — February 24, 2017 @ 5:39 pm

  44. If my job made me park tailors and I refused because I have a suspended license and no experience with a commercial vehicle and I got in an accident at who’s at fault

    Comment by David — March 30, 2017 @ 4:06 am

  45. Question for you. I have several classes of PIV equipment at my facilities.
    Class I, IV, even a class VII Lull. If I put my yard jockeys through PIV
    Training, which class vehicle training should I put them through.

    Comment by Barbara Reeser — April 11, 2017 @ 8:44 pm

  46. My question is that if you use a 2 axle Yard Hostler to transport loaded trailers from one warehouse to another on a public roadway do they still fall under the legal weight limitations ? My guess is that they would.

    Thank you

    Comment by David Sanchez — June 23, 2017 @ 3:55 pm

  47. The last comment made was in November of 2015. Do you have any recent comments or information about yardswtichers?

    Comment by Joan Colombero — July 30, 2017 @ 9:26 pm

  48. Can a spotter go to another facility on the road in a business complex not plated other facility 1.4 miles away.

    Comment by Mike stone — August 30, 2017 @ 9:40 am

  49. I have one technical question which I need some documentation on. If we obtain an ON ROAD SPOTTER, which is DOT certified and licensed, then I realize that the driver must be CDL certified when driving off our property. My question is, “If we are operating the on road spotter on our property ( just moving trailers from door to door) must the operator be CDL certified in order to do this?”

    Comment by Michael Easton — September 5, 2017 @ 4:15 pm

  50. Want to know what are the guidelines or safety rules when training a new driver how to operate a yard spotter. Is the trainer allowed to ride along with the trainee and physically show the trainee or is this not allowed trying set up an outline and would appreciate any assist Thanks

    Rob

    Comment by Robert Souchet — September 7, 2017 @ 5:04 pm

  51. In va if I surrendered my CDL can I get it back? do I have to redo all tests?

    Comment by Marlene — September 22, 2017 @ 3:08 pm

  52. Was informed by our supervision(Wal-Mart) we must walk “backwards” from our yard trucks (Yanmar) because someone sprained a knee. We have STEPS on both sides for excess and access to our cabs. Why would they recommend a travel direction that you cannot see?

    Comment by Marvin Reichert — October 4, 2017 @ 9:05 pm

  53. Is it in violation if a yard dog heater is broken?

    Comment by Tyler — October 27, 2017 @ 6:27 am

  54. What would not make yard trucks compliant with California Air Resources Board’s Cargo Handling Equipment Regulations while being used on public thoroughfares?
    It appears that these vehicles’ suspensions are not on-road worthy being very noisy.

    Comment by Angel Sierra — November 13, 2017 @ 7:32 pm

  55. I have 2 yard jockeys that do moves in our yard.
    They are not plated they just have permits. Is it legal for them to be driven on the road with a employee that doesn’t have a CDL license?

    Comment by SHELLY HURLEY — November 17, 2017 @ 12:37 pm

  56. Does an operator of a Hostler pulling a trailer a short distance (a city block), on a public road need to have a CDL. Hostlers are not plated, but would like to know even if they are plated?

    Comment by Cliff Corning — November 22, 2017 @ 11:35 am

  57. Wondering what class of powered industrial truck is the yard dog truck considered?

    Comment by Joel Baylor — December 18, 2017 @ 9:26 am

  58. William H. Kincaid

    I don’t think the classifications apply outside of forklifts. However, if they did (or if they do!) I would say Class V, which is a truck with I.C. engine and pneumatic tires. The main reasons we have these classes is so we have a handy way to know where we can use a particulr type of truck and where we should not use it. Yard dogs being designed for the yard, that is their territory, and except in some unusual situations that is enough of a classification.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 10:02 am

  59. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 10:07 am

  60. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 10:08 am

  61. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. The CHE rules apply to selected use locations and vary depending on the age of the vehicle. Without more details I can’t answer your first question but I can refer you to this very handy document: https://www.arb.ca.gov/ports/cargo/documents/chefaq110617.pdf
    Generally yard dogs are not meant for anything other than minimal road use – once in a while, we might need to take it to the shop or to the Arco for a fillup, but yes, these vehicles aren’t really built to be on-road vehicles. Tractors are designed for that use.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 10:18 am

  62. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. To an OSHA inspector, safety-related defects are always a potential violation. The question of whether or not to cite it comes down to whether or not there is an employee exposed to a hazard. Given there are people outdoors and indoors working year round in very cold conditions, it would take some extreme conditions to get OSHA to write a citation for a broken heater. As a former employer I would always recommend fixing these sorts of things! Without the people who made it run, my business would have just been an empty building with some machines in it. The boss needs to keep them happy above all. A couple hundred bucks for a heater repair is nothing much, believe me.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 10:24 am

  63. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. They are perhaps referring to “Three Point Contact”, which is a safer way to get in and out of a cab. It is a standard recommendation for preventing knee injuries. As a person who has had a knee injury and the resulting surgery, take my word for it, using Three Point Contact is much easier.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:09 am

  64. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. That question is out of my area and depends on both Federal and state laws. Check out what DVM.com says at https://www.dmv.com/va/virginia/cdl-commercial-drivers-license-renewal

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:13 am

  65. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. I don’t know of any specific rules on ride-along training. It is a commonly used teaching practice and a good one. If my dad hadn’t taken time to ride along with me when I was first learning to drive a car, I can only imagine how bad a driver I would be today.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:15 am

  66. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. On your own property, no CDL is needed. Some form of in-house driver training process can take the place of a CDL on your private property.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:16 am

  67. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT. Check with the state DMV to know what’s specifically enforced.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:18 am

  68. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response, I’ve been away from the blog for a while – if you like comments, take a look at all of the new ones I’m posting.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:19 am

  69. William H. Kincaid

    Take a look at the GVWR rating label, usually inside the driver side door. It will tell you the design GVWR which is what you go by in determining if it’s under or over. Note also the COMBINED weight also matters – if you’re pulling a trailer, that load gets added.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:20 am

  70. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. Put them through the training for whatever vehicle they are going to use and for the areas they will be operating in. You can combine them all if you want or break them out. The bottom line is they should be trained to safely operate whatever they are operating in the areas they operate them in.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:23 am

  71. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response, I’ve been away from the blog for a while. Impossible to say who’s at fault with the facts available to me, and I have no opinion on it. OSHA’s PIT rules require operator training and an evaluation of the operator’s skills but most states don’t mention drivers’ license status – some states such as Michigan have special rules such a an eye test, though.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:27 am

  72. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. You should be trained by someone who has the skills and knowledge to do the training, and evaluated by someone who has skills and knowledge to do the evaluation. The phrase “certified trainer” doesn’t really come up in the OSHA PIT rule.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:28 am

  73. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. Check into your state’s DMV and DOT rules. I think you need the physical but I defer to the local and Federal authorities. The Federal rule is here: https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/retrieveECFR?gp=1&ty=HTML&h=L&mc=true&=PART&n=pt49.5.391#se49.5.391_141

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:33 am

  74. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the slow response. If it’s 100% private property, not open to the public, then OSHA powered industrial truck training would suffice. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:36 am

  75. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:37 am

  76. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. If a yard dog is used on public roads in interstate commerce, the hours of service rules could apply – stranger things have happened!

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:39 am

  77. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. That’s up to the local authorities and local/state laws. Some states exempt some vehicles from licensing, such as farm trucks. You need to know what the rules are for the specific roads you’re operating on, though, because there are different rules for different places. Don’t want to get a ticket for operating an unregistered vehicle on the public way!

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:41 am

  78. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:49 am

  79. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:49 am

  80. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. I’d assume yes, unless there is some exception locally for these vehicles. Always best to check the local laws and state rules.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:52 am

  81. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. Not if it is 100% parking lot use.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:52 am

  82. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. Yes, I’ve had that question before. It depends on what the local police think is OK, because they are the ones who give out the tickets. I’d assume yes, unless there is some exception locally for these vehicles. Always best to check the local laws and state rules.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 11:53 am

  83. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. No, as long as it never leaves the parking lot.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 12:01 pm

  84. William H. Kincaid

    Apologies for the delayed response. A little out of my area, and probably up to the local law and police as well as DOT. Always best to check the DOT rules https://cms.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations and the state rules for enforcing DOT.

    Comment by William H. Kincaid — December 18, 2017 @ 12:11 pm

  85. Thank you Sir for providing this valuable information!

    Joel Baylor

    Comment by Joel Baylor — December 18, 2017 @ 3:13 pm

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